Answered By: Renee Stokes (Perth)
Last Updated: 15 Sep 2017     Views: 90

Sometimes the information you wish to use is a reference within another source. This is known as a secondary source. That is, the source you are consulting is one step removed from the original or primary source. For example, if you are using an article by Nickel and wish to use information attributed to multiple sources, you would use;

Barnett & Yutrzenka, Congress, Hill, Mamalakis and Reamer (cited in Nickel, 2004) agree that ...

In the bibliography or reference list, you only need to source the work you consulted, example:

Nickel, M. B. (2004). Professional boundaries: The dilemma of dual and multiple relationships in rural clinical practice. Counseling and Clinical Psychology Journal, 1(1), 17-22. Retrieved from
http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.endeavour.edu.au/eds/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=b25295d7-78b2-4053-9328-1a09c0a98f79%40sessionmgr4010&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#AN=12167361&db=aph

 

This is an example for SOCF111 Assignment 1.

For other assignments you may need to go to the original source instead of having the multiple authors within the in-text reference.

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